This is AbroadChina.Org's cache of http://www.eslcafe.com/jobinfo/asia/sefer.cgi?display:1078485284-38162.txt as retrieved on 2005-3-17 17:28:36 PST. AbroadChina.Org's cache is the snapshot that we took of the page as we crawled the web. The page may have changed since that time. This cached page may reference images which are no longer available.
AbroadChina.Org is not affiliated with the authors of this page nor responsible for its content.
 
Advice on giving notice of leave
I have written numerous messages on the good things I enjoy about China. And with the good silk of realities comes the tawdry fringe. Here is my advice. If, for any reason, you choose to change jobs…. Hold out on telling your employer until it is absolutely and ethically necessary.
I have worked for a college under the network of Jilin University for two years and have decided it's time to move on. During my first year of employment I was treated like a princess (I'm the only full-time foreign teacher at my remote campus).

After the first year's contract ended and the second year renewal was in effect, all attitudes changed. In fact, I received little cooperation from the Chinese staff. The Dean remained supportive, but he only visited the campus once a week while working on his PhD. No Dean, no cooperation.

When I was offered a fine new job in another country during the Spring Festival break, I decided to give Kalun Lake College of Business Management ample notice. Because the campus is remote and my city (Changchun) is cold, cold, cold, in the winter… it is difficult to attract good teachers to work here. Yes, I thought I was doing the honorable thing by giving 6 months' notice.

I think you know where I'm going with this. Since giving notice, I am now the outcast. And today, I received half of my salary because someone "made a mistake."

Yes: if you intend to leave a job, hold out on giving notice so you can work peaceably and with pay for the remains of the contract.

Patricia
Changchun, China
prloveinchina@yahoo.com